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The North Carolina Symphony 



Celebrate 

r * e ar$ of 
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Teachers Handbook 
1996-1997 Season 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 






http://archive.org/details/northcarolinasym1997lati 



The North Carolina Symphony 

Teachers Handbook 

1996-1997 

Table of Contents 

Preface by Jackson Parkh urst i i 

Symphony No. 4 in A, "Italian" 
Movement IV: SaStarello: Presto 

Felix Mendelssohn ( 1 809-1 847) 
Classroom Activities by Lydia Gill 1 

Polovetsian Dances from Prince Igor 

Alexander Borodin ( 1 833-1 887) 
Classroom Activities by Sandy Matthews and Liz Smart 17 

Jubilation — An Overture 

Robert Ward (born 1917) 
Classroom Activities by Robin Smathers 27 

Notes 35 

Puzzles 36 

Questionnaire : 42 



The North Carolina SymphonyTeachers Handbook © 1996 by the North Carolina Symphony Society, Inc Reproduction 
of this book in its entirety is strictly forbidden. Permission is given to duplicate charts, diagrams, scores, puzzles, etc. for 
classroom use only. 

The North Carolina Symphony education concerts are made possible by a grant-in-aid from the State of North Carolina 
and from The National Endowment of the Arts 

Our thanks to the Edgar Foster Daniels Foundation for their grant to underwrite the cost of education materials 
As part of their commitment to education, Glaxo Wellcome, lnc has made a generous grant to fund conductors for 
music education concerts 

The North Carolina Symphony 

2 East South Street 

Raleigh, NC 27601 

(919)733-2750 

Jackson Parkhurst 
Assistant Conductor and Director of Education 



Preface 



The 1996-1997 season is the fifty-first that the North Carolina Symphony has piled on the 
busses and headed out to perform education concerts. Much is different from the way things were 
in 1946, but our commitment to education and providing the best we have to offer is as strong as 
ever. It is important to emphasize that the orchestra that the students hear is the same one that plays 
Mozart, Mahler, Beethoven, and Bernstein in evening concerts. We believe that our education 
concert audiences are just as important as our evening audiences. We also value the work that you 
do because your preparation of the children makes the experience more than a field trip. It gives 
your students the background that allows them to focus on what is happening at the concert. This 
creates strong memories as those of us who work for the Symphony know from those adult citizens 
who tell us about their childhood trip to the Symphony. They all remember what was played and 
can still sing the songs they learned (and sometimes do). The success that we enjoy in serving as 
the state symphony we gladly share with you. 

We welcome a new associate conductor to the Symphony this year. He is William Henry 
Curry and he comes to us from the symphonies of New Orleans and Atlanta. He has had a great deal 
of experience performing education concerts and has conducted a number for us in recent seasons. 
We know that you will enjoy his work. 

I want to thank all of you who have written, called, and sent "get weir' messages to me in 
the last year. I am still struggling with CFIDS (Chronic Fatigue and Immune Disfunction Syndrome) 
but am also still planning on recovery. I know that if good wishes could make me well I would be 
the healthiest person in North Carolina. It means a great deal, and I am grateful. 

We are indebted to this year's writers of the Teachers Handbook. I am especially grateful 
to Robin Smathers who generously helped me out at the last moment. Thanks to Melinda Wilkinson 
for consultation on song selection. 

I hope this year's songs are successful with your kids. Since Spanish is a language that 
students are learning, it seemed appropriate to do De Colores. Although it presents some challenge 
to learn, Momma Don 7 'Low should make up for it. If you do not already know it, you do after you 
have heard it once. Hopefully it is appealingly outrageous enough for kids to enjoy singing and 
making up verses. At the concert the conductor will offer several alternatives for the fifth verse for 
which the audience can vote. 

I want to emphasize that the songs need to be memorized for singing at the concert. When 
students bring the student books, they do not sing. We do the songs for the children to participate 
in making music with the orchestra. If, for some reason, you can not or do not want to do them at 
your concert, tell the conductor to leave them out. We run into situations in which some of the 
children know the songs and some do not. I believe that it is better not to do them than to leave out 
part of the audience. Please reach a consensus locally before concert time. 

As with the songs, the material in this book is meant to be helpful and fun. We do not 
require that all or any of it be used. It is produced to be an aid to your good teaching. 

We are grateful for your hard work in introducing the children of our state to great music. 
It is incredible that the arts have to struggle to give society what it can not live without. Keep on 
keepin' on. All the best. 

Jack 

July, 1996 

it 



NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY 1996-97 EDUCATION PROGRAM 



Symphony No. 4 in A, "Italian" Classroom Activities 

Movement IV, Saltarello: Presto by Lydia Gill 

Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) 



Introduction 

Here are some quotes from line Werner's biography of Mendelssohn 

"My Felix grows under my eyes . Everything attains solidity, hardly lacking are strength 
and power Everything develops spontaneously from within, and externals touch him only 
superficially " (Zelter. one of Mendelssohn's most influential teachers, to Goethe) 

"Art and life are not two different things ." 

(From a letter of Mendelssohn to his friend Devrient) 

' . . words seem to me so ambiguous, so vague, so easily misunderstandable in comparison 
with genuine music, which fills the sou! with things a thousand times better than words Ideas 
expressed by a beloved music are, to me. not too indefinite to put them into words, but on the 
contrary, too definite (From Mendelssohn to Andre Souchay, October 15,1 842) 



Biographical Facts: Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy 

1 Mendelssohn's grandfather Moses, who died in 1786. was an extraordinary man, a 
hunchback from a Jewish ghetto who came to Berlin at age 14 and became a world renowned 
religious scholar and philosopher He was called the Jewish Socrates by his contemporaries His 
ideas about religion were based on reason and were influential in bringing about reform in Judaism 
and other religions He translated parts of the Hebrew Bible into German and wrote in the preface 
that his children must learn the Torah and the Word of God He had six children, and 
Mendelssohn's father Abraham was the second son 

2 Mendelssohn was born into a conservative and wealthy Jewish banking family in Hamburg, 
Germany They soon moved to Berlin where society was very anti-Semitic. His parents were not 
orthodox and they had their children baptized as Christians under the name Mendelssohn-Bartholdy 
(the name Mendelssohn's uncle had taken on becoming a Christian). His education was rigorous 
and thorough under the direction of his parents He rose at 5 am every day of his life to begin 
work Mendelssohn's father allowed the children to sleep until 6 a.m. on Sundays, the morning the 
family held musicales in their home with invited friends and celebrities from the cultural and 
intellectual society of Europe All four children participated in the musicales The father would 
hire an orchestra for Mendelssohn to conduct and try out his compositions. 

3. Mendelssohn's first piano teacher was his mother Lea, then Ignaz Moscheles, one of the 



best pianists of the time, worked with him. Mendelssohn and his older sister, Fanny, were both 
child prodigies, but Fanny was not allowed to become a professional musician. By age eight, 
Mendelsssohn was giving concerts, but, unlike Mozart, he did not perform as a youth throughout 
Europe; he followed a more conservative course. 

4. Mendelssohn wrote his first symphony when he was fifteen years old. It is the Symphony 
in C minor, Opus 1 1 , finished in 1 824. 

5. By 1825, when he was sixteen, Mendelssohn had already composed operas, concertos, 
symphonies, piano music, cantatas, and the E flat Octet, which showed he was one of the greats. 

6. When he was seventeen, he wrote incidental music for Shakespeare's play A Midsummer 
Night 's Dream. (The Wedding March from this work is traditionally played today as the bride and 
groom march out after exchanging their wedding vows. ) The orchestral technique he demonstrated 
in A Midsummer Night 's Dream was exceptional and has been called his most perfect composition. 

7. In 1 829 when Mendelssohn was only twenty , he arranged and conducted J S. Bach's St. 
Matthew Passion at a large concert in Berlin with chorus and orchestra. His sister Fanny sang in 
the chorus. This successful performance reawakened an interest in Bach's music which had been 
neglected since Bach's death in 1750. 

8. Mendelssohn's travels took him to England where he was very popular as conductor and 
performer, as well as composer. He became a personal favorite or Queen Victoria and Prince 
Albert. They especially liked to hear him play the piano because he played in a pure Classic style, 
elegantly, precisely, logically, without too much pedal and without the fireworks of Liszt or the 
ambiguity or plaintiveness of Chopin. 

9. Mendelssohn's sister Fanny was his closest confidant in his youth, and they always remained 
close. In order to overcome the barriers to publishing music by women, Mendelssohn had some of 
Fanny's music published under his name and was always proud to say it was hers. 

10. Mendelssohn married Cecile Jeanrenaud in 1 837, and they had four children and a happy 
marriage. 

1 1 . Mendelssohn was a fine organist. Once when he was in England he was playing the organ 
at St. Paul's Cathedral in London for a large group of organists. They kept asking him to play more 
until suddenly the organ would not play because the organ blowers had let the air out of the pipes. 
They were angry because they were tired and ready to go home, and the musicians would not bt 
Mendelssohn stop. 

12. In 1 835 Mendelssohn, at age twenty-six, became the conductor of the Leipzig Gewandhaus 
Orchestra. Mendelssohn was a demanding and efficient conductor. He was one of the first 
conductors to conduct with a baton. At age thirty-three, in 1842, he founded the Leipzig 
Conservatory. He and Robert Schumann both taught composition and piano there. 



13. As a composer, Mendelssohn was conservative compared to his Romantic contemporaries 
in the first half of the nineteenth century. He was a genius, and the fact that his music fell out of 
vogue in the early twentieth century does not mean it was not of the highest quality. If anything, his 
music was too well liked and had become too imitated by composers of lesser genius. 

14. Mendelssohn composed chamber music, church music, concertos for instruments and 
orchestra, oratorios, organ music, piano music, secular choral works, songs for one or two voices 
and piano, symphonies: C minor; Reformation; Italian, Lobgesang (Hymn of Praise), and Scotch, 
concert overtures, and theater music— everything except a successful opera. 

1 5. By the time Mendelssohn was thirty-eight, he had been worn down by his frantically busy 
pace as composer, conductor, performer, teacher, administrator, father and husband, prolific 
correspondent, and founder of music festivals. When Fanny suddenly died of stroke in 1847, he 
heard the news and had a stroke himself He survived that stroke but six months later, after he had 
returned to Leipzig from resting with his family in Switzerland, had another paralyzing stroke and 
died. Donald Grout in his A History of Western Music sums up Mendelssohn as a composer: "His 
music, like his life, flowed serenely and harmoniously. It is essentially Classical in outline, imbued 
with Romantic color and sentiment, but never more than lightly touched with Romantic pathos or 
passion." 



Symphony No. 4 in A 

Young Felix Mendelssohn began composing this symphony while in Italy during the winter 
of 1 830-3 1 . He called it "Italian" because he wrote much of it in Italy Imagine how happy he, a 
German, would have been to be in warm Italy in the winter. He could have seen the wild folk dance, 
the saltarello, being danced in the city squares, and heard its lively accompanying tunes. (The 
influence of place was important in another of his symphonies, called the " Scotch," and the somber 
mood of that work is as much a contrast to the "Italian" as Scotland is to Italy.) Mendelssohn was 
twenty-one years old during that winter in Italy and already a mature musician, hard-working and 
very self-critical. He constantly revised his compositions all his life, and his Fourth Symphony was 
no exception. He was never fully satisfied with it and did not release it for publication or perform 
it in Germany during his lifetime. Its completion was commissioned, along with other works, by 
the London Philharmonic Society in 1 832. He conducted the premiere performance in London on 
May 13, 1 833. Despite never publishing it himself, he said it was "the merriest piece I have yet 
composed, especially the last movement." (I quote from the back of a Philips recording.) Of his 
five symphonies, this one has probably been his most popular over the years. Its movements are 1 ) 
Allegro vivace, A major, 6/8; 2) Andante con moto, D minor, 4/4; 3 ) Con moto moderato, A major, 
3/4 (Menuetto); 4) Presto, A minor, 4/4 (Saltarello). 



Fourth Movement's Musical Base: The Sattarello and The Tarantella 

The fourth movement, which we are focussing on here, is called Saltarello, after the Italian 
dance that, along with the more familiar tarantella, inspire the movement. The word saltarello 
means a little hop or a small leap in Italian. In the article in Grove on saltarello I learned that 
saltarellos are fast dances usually in triple meter of Italian origin (mentioned in a 14th century 



Tuscan manuscript) and they have gone through at least three stages of development over the 
centuries. In the 15th century a saltarello was one of the Italian court dances, more elegant and 
formal than the later folk version. Here, as described in Grove, is a court dance called saltarello 
from 15th century "balli choreographies:" 



(L = Left, R 


= Right, T = Feet Together) 










L L 


R T 


R 


R 


L 


T 


Step Hop 

J J 


Step Together 

J J 


Step 


Hop 

J 


Step 

J 


Together 

J 


L L 


R T 


R 


R 


L 


T 


Step Hop 

J J 


Step Together 


Step 

J. 


Hop 


Step 


Together 



In the 16th century some saltarellos were instrumental afterdances in paired dances, similar 
to the French pavan and galliard pairing. The meter of these saltarellos was either 3/4 or 6/8. 
According to Arbeau ( 1588) and Morley ( 1597) the saltarello was an Italian galliard, except in the 
Italian dance the feet were kept closer to the ground to allow a faster tempo. Here's a description 
from Grove of how to dance a galliard which might have been the same as a saltarello: 

5 steps taken to 6 crotchets; the first 4 steps were 'grues 1 (the dancer springs on one foot 
while raising the other forward as if to kick someone), each ornamented by a little hop on 
the weight-bearing foot, a leap, and a rest. 

The courtly saltarello was danced mainly before the 17th century. The third form of the 
saltarello, the wilder folk dance, dates from the end of the 1 8th century and was popular throughout 
the 19th century. Some of its steps are in current folk dances. The dance Mendelssohn based his 
saltarello on was the Italian folk dance. According to the New Grove Dictionary of Music and 
Musicians, it was in 3/4 or 6/8 with a long, short, long, short rhythm, was generally danced solo or 
by one couple, and consisted of increasingly rapid hopping steps around an imaginary semicircle, 
accompanied by 'violent' arm movements. Guitars, tambourines, and singing provided the musical 
accompaniment. 

Although Mendelssohn's fourth movement is called saltarello, it contains not only a 
saltarello, but also another dance, the tarantella. The tarantella differs from the saltarello in 
consisting of continuous rapid notes in triple time (6/8) without the bouncy rhythm (the hop) of .he 
saltarello. The tarantella probably originated in Taranto, a town in southern Italy. However, the 
traditional story is that if a tarantula spider bites a person and he dances the tarantella, he will 
survive the poison. 



Movement IV. Saltarello. in A Minor. Presto. 4/4 

The lively Saltarello movement is an unusual movement. It seems through-composed, but 
can be considered instead as being in binary form, as Preston Stedman does in his analysis in his 
book, The Symphony . The minor key does not dampen the excitement! The melody of the 
saltarello theme literally leaps out of the important rhythmic motive of the six bar introduction. 
That rhythmic motive unifies the whole movement and plants the seeds of much of the thematic 
material It introduces both of the sections and occurs as a pedal tone accompaniment. The bouncy 
saltarello theme dominates the first section. Several other themes appear, some in duple time, 
contrasting with the triplets of the rhythmic motive and the saltarello theme. The second section 
begins almost exactly like the first, with the rhythmic motive of the introduction leading into the 
saltarello theme played by woodwinds. But then a surprise occurs. An important new theme is 
introduced by the first violins -- the tarantella theme which dominates the second section. 

This movement reflects Mendelssohn's skill as an orchestrator and genius at scoring for 
woodwinds and strings. The woodwinds and strings energize the music, first in the fast, light 
staccatos of the saltarello theme and then in the perpetual motion of the tarantella theme. 
Mendelssohn contrasts the colors of the different instruments within the families of instruments and 
between them. At the beginning of the second section, the clarinets, then flutes, then oboes start 
the saltarello theme before the violins introduce the tarantella theme. In the imitation of the 
tarantella theme that follows, the color of the violins contrasts with that of the violas, then again 
each woodwind instrument's color is heard. More tone color contrasts occur when the woodwinds 
and the strings answer each other conversationally. One must listen linearly to this piece to 
appreciate the tone colors and the contrapuntal techniques -- among them, imitation, fugato, and 
inversion. The long crescendos from very soft to very loud are brought about by thickening the 
texture and adding instruments, not just by playing more loudly. All of these aspects of the 
movement, and many others, mean that many musical concepts can be studied in Mendelssohn's 
saltarello. 

Lesson I: Orff Orchestration for the Saltarello Theme. Mendelssohn's 4th Symphony, 
Movement IV 

Objective: Students will play accompaniments on Orff instruments with the adapted saltarello 
theme. 

1 . Warm-up by having students do body percussion with the teacher, or echoing the teacher, 
until most can do it easily, then do it with the teacher as the teacher sings the added words to the 
saltarello theme. 

2. Teach the instrumental parts one at a time and let at least two students at a time try the part 
until each part can be done while the large group sings and/or does body percussion. 

3. Teach the words to the students by having them echo the teacher, then sing with the teacher, 
continuing body percussion. 

4. Add instrument parts to accompany the singing of the saltarello theme. 

5. Teach the melody to recorder students and keyboard students to perform with the other 
instruments. 



FIRST THEME - ADAPTED 



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When Men- delssohn wrote this sym-pho- ny theme he thought of a 

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snap 
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Lesson II: Creative Movement, Tarantella Theme 

Objective: Students will learn to sing the tarantella theme with original words and add a creative 
movement to it in small groups to perform for the class. 

1 . Warm-up by having students do the body percussion by echoing the teacher, then doing it 
with the teacher, then doing it while the teacher sings words to the tarantella theme . 

2. Have students echo the words and then sing them with the teacher with body percussion. 

3. Divide the students into groups of 4 or 5 and create a movement to accompany the tarantella 
theme. Think of a visual for the music to imitate in your movement (students may come up with 
ocean waves, leaves blowing in the wind, a boat on the water, etc.). Add streamers or scarves to 
their movements. 

4. Have each group do its movement for the class while the remainder of the class helps sing 
the tarantella theme (unless the small group wants to sing and move without help) 

Lesson III: Creation of a Dance, Saltarello Theme 

Objective: Students will create a dance in small groups to perform to the saltarello theme 

1 . Warm-up by having the students sing the saltarello theme with body percussion pre\ lously 
learned. 

2. Provide information about the saltarello and question students about the kinds of movement 
that might be part of the dance. 

3. Show the students some steps as described in the Grove article mentioned above. (Step left, 
hop, step right, feet together; Step right, hop, step left, feet together. ) Have students try these steps. 
The right heel out, left heel out, right heel, left heel, right heel of the Mexican Hat Dance works well 
with the music. Use jazz hands on the trill at the end of the saltarello theme, followed by a clap. 

4. Divide the students into groups and invent a dance for the saltarello theme. Use percussion 
instruments to reinforce steady beat and rhvthm. 




TARANTELLA THEME 



m 



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3 Whir-ling and twir-ling and turn- mg and spinning, the dance called the ta - ran - tel - la is 



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win ning. The strings play in re-lay, the race they are run-ning. The vi - o- lins go first, there's do time for 

, 3 — I 



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Body Percussion Ostinato Pattern 



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When Men- delssohn wrote this sym-pho- ny theme he thought of a 

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11 



Call Chart for Movement IV, Saltarello, Mendelssohn's Fourth Symphony 
Section I 

1. Introduction: chords under trill in ww, rhythmic motive, w.w. and strings, just vln, p 



* W»V»'V»»»^V»'V 



i 



« 






it j^«. i.>»»««v*v>. 



f >9M@B{$P 



~7 

2. Saltarello Theme (Al), meas. 6-33, flutes in 3rds, then clar. /flutes, rhythmic motive on pedal 

tones in vlns., low strings; meas 22, saltarello theme in vlns.; meas. 26, saltarello theme in vlns. and 
w.w , creas., timpani & low strings on rhythmic motive 




ifcP£ F 4^Ef&0T^T 




3. Theme A2, meas 34, strings, descending eights, contrasts with w.w. & saltarello rhythm, 

strings 





4. Theme A3, meas. 44, tarantella-like with 3-note descending repeated triplets, low strg, vlns. 

Climax in duple eighths, ff, full orch. chords 




j iipiis ig; 



|npi 



##& 



Hm 



&§£ 



/ 

5. Theme Bl : meas. 52, Saltarello-like, strings, imitation; w.w , descendings half notes 

E 




r (vi.i) 



6. Theme B2: meas. 61, strings, conversational exchange; w.w., rhythmic motive, meas. 70, 

staccato eights, strings, imitation jg] 



»' vD,T„ 



s 



^(Vl.D) ' 

7 Saltarello Theme: meas. 76, w.w.; creas.; meas. 82, descending staccato eighths in strings; 

rhythmic motive, strings, exchanges with B2, w.w. and horns; creas. 




8. Theme C: meas. 97, w.w. and strings; rhythmic motive in low strings, trumpets, timpani, ff; 

descending, staccato chords, full orch., end of Section I with rhythmic motive decrescendo 




12 



Section II 

9. Saltarello Theme: meas. 106, clarinets, then flutes, then oboes; rhythmic motive in strings, p 



10. Tarantella Theme (D): meas. 122, 1st vlns., pp, imitation strings 




i ^jfj^ccr ' ^J^Ccr i ^cfl'^^ 



?e? 



astuaJ- 



3= 




11. Tarantella fragment: meas. 148, w.w. in imitation, bassoons start; meas. 156, w.w., rhythmic 
motive , conversation with strings, tarantella fragments , £|.. 



12. Tarantella fugato: strings, creas., chords in w.w. and cornets 




13. Saltarello Theme: meas. 179, strings (vlns), lower strings have rhythmic motive; meas. 186, 
interruption of saltarello theme by chromatically ascending chords in strings, exchange with rhythmic 
motive in trumpets and timpani until full chords, ff, bring music to climax, meas. 191 



14. Tarantella Theme: meas. 196, cellos, violas; meas. 200, imitation; creas.; timpani & horns , 
steady pedal tones \ . , , , 

J J J J J J J J 




15. Saltarello Theme: meas. 210, strings, f, sempre creas.; whole note chords in full orch. with 
rhythmic motive in low strings; conversation with triplets, strings '*'>. ■#■-££ 

Saltarello Theme: meas 222, low strings, then vlns., then low strings, with descending half 
notes on offbeats, w.w. 







17. Rhythmic Motive: meas. 234, strings; syncopated chords in w.w., conversation 

18. Saltarello fragments: meas. 255, w.w.; rhythmic motive, timpani; triplets, w.w. and strings; 
creas., full orch. chords 



tiro. 



ipptiii 

Y CI . )r\ A pp leggiero 







Crossword Puzzle based on facts about Mendelssohn and the Symphony No. 4, Italian, 
Movement IV 



ACROSS 



Mendelssohn lived in the first half of the 



century 



8 Mendelssohn traveled to this countrv and was popular in Queen Victorias court 

1 Mendelssohn's age when he wrote his first symphony 

14 Mendelssohn performed this composer's music when it had almost been forgotten 

15. Mendelssohn was the younger of Fanny 

16 Mendelssohn died at the age of -eight 



DOWN 

1 The " March" is the most famous music from A Midsummer Night \s Dream by 
Mendelssohn 

2 Homeland of Mendelssohn 



3. Mendelssohn's first piano teacher 

4. Fast 

5. Author of the play A Midsummer Night 's Dream 

One of the instruments Mendelssohn studied and played 

9. Mendelssohn's age when he played his first concert 

1 1 A saltarello is an Italian with little leaps. 

1 2 City where Mendelssohn grew up 

1 3 Mendelssohn's talented sister. 




Mendelssohn 

Painting by ]. IV. Ckiide 

1 International Felix Mendelssohn Soclet\ . liasei i 



14 



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As you know, the information and teaching suggestions so far presented here are basically 
from a music teacher's perspective directed toward teaching music alone However, the importance 
of "integrating" what we teach with the entire curriculum is enjoying increasing attention. 

The idea of this integration is. of course, to show how music can contribute to all aspects of 
a child's education and to work towards this by sharing goals with the whole school and planning 
in advance with those who want to and are willing to participate In its simplest form, it is merely 
teaching our musical concepts with an awareness of how they relate to other disciplines Even 
without consciously aiming to do so. we already reinforce math in our study of rhythm, language 
arts in our use of words, and kinesthetic learning in our movement activities (We can hope, of 
course, that other disciplines will teach their concepts so as to reinforce the goals of the music 
curriculum ) 

1 hus, it is interesting to consider in the context of our presentation of this movement of 
Mendelssohn's Fourth Symphonv how we might deliberately introduce some "integration" into our 
teaching Here are some examples of how we might consciously move in that direction 



Have students read the student booklet prepared by Jackson Parkhurst and make up 
questions to ask each other Use student generated questions throughout the 
preparation Put their questions on a chart and use them later for review 



Discuss what was going on in America (use social studies book) during 
Mendelssohn's lifetime ( 1809-1847) Make a date/event chart for that period of 
Mendelssohn's life and for that same period in American history List what students 
know about at the beginning of the preparation for the concert and then following 
the preparation to see what they have added to their knowledge Enlist help from the 
school team 



3 Mendelssohn's parents thought travel important for his education Locate where 

he went on a map (France. England. Switzerland. Italy, and , of course. Germany ) 



Assign a creative writing paper on what the saltarello dance might have looked like 
and when and where it might have been danced Prepare for this assignment by 
teaching about the saltarello and working on vocabulary for this assignment. Get 
classroom or language arts teachers to help 



Make up a dance in groups to try with the music and perform it for the others. 
Prepare for this by studying the rhythms involved and doing a dance to the first theme 
of the saltarello by Mendelssohn, shown to them bv the teacher 



16 



Bibliography 

I Brownell, David and Conkle, Nancy, Great Composers. Bach to Berlioz . Santa Barbara, Ca.: 

Bellerophon Books. 

2. Grout, Donald Jay, A History of Western Music , NY.: WW. Norton & Co., 1960. 

3. Hotchkiss, Gwen, Music Smart . West Nyack, N Y : Parker Pub. Co., 1990, pp. 24 1-257 
4 Kamien, Roger. Music: An Appreciation . 2nd briefed., N. Y : McGraw-Hill, Inc., 1994 

5. The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians , ed by Stanley Sadie. Vol 16. London 
MacMillan Pub Limited, 1980, pp. 430-432. 

6. Schonberg, Harold C, The Lives of the Great Composers . Revised Edition, N Y : W W 
Norton & Co., inc., 1981, pp 216-226. 

7. Snyder, Sue, Integrate with Integrity: Music Across the Elementary Curriculum . West 
Norwalk. CT: IDEAS Press, 1996. 

8 Stedman, Preston, The Symphony , N J. Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1979 pp. 105-1 14 

9 Werner, Eric, Mendelssohn . A New Image of the Composer and His Age . London: Collier- 
MacMillan Limited. 1963 



Acknowledgments 

Special thanks to Norma Walter for her help with this paper and presentation. She especially 
contributed her expertise by writing the Orff orchestration, helping add words to the themes, and 
finding resource materials. Thank you, also, to Elaine Sills for reading the paper and making 
suggestions. Both of these ladies are music specialists in Moore County. Thank you to my friend. 
Olga Horn, of Laurinburg for the picture of Mendelssohn. 



Personal Biographical Information 

Lydia Gill teaches general music K-6 in the Moore County Schools, for the moment at 
Aberdeen Elementary School in Aberdeen and Sandhills Farm Life School near Whispering Pines 
She prepared for this experience by teaching elementary Spanish for six years at numerous venues 
in Moore County, until the solons decided that Spanish was no longer relevant The transition to 
music from Spanish, however, was only the obverse from her even earlier experience teaching music 
pre-K through 12 at The O'Neal School in Southern Pines for three years. 

She has a B.A. from Duke University in Spanish and an MM. from U.N.C. -Chapel Hill 
She enjoys playing the piano, teaching a few private piano students, and volunteering with the local 
N. C. Symphony chapter, Arts Council, Weymouth Music Committee, and church activities She 
is married to Doug Gill, who practices law in Moore County. They have a retired greynound and 
three post-nest children. 



17 



"Polovctsian Dances" from PRINCE IGOR Classroom Activities 

Alexander Porfyrevich Borodin ( 1833 - 1887) b\ Sandy Matthews and Liz Sman 

A BO I I THE COMPOSER 

Before 1850 verv tew Russian composers were full-time professionals Some were civil servants, 
some sailors, some soldiers, and as in the ease of Alexander Borodin, a distinguished scientist and 
chemist 

Me was horn on November I !. 1833 in St Petersburg, the illegitimate son of Prince Luke 
( ihedeanov and was named after an unrelated serf on his father's estate His mother was the wife 
ol an Armv doctor I lis lather died when he was seven, and he was raised by his mother Because 
he was a frail child, he was not sent to am public school, but received his early education at home 
with a governess and private tutors 

His first \i\id musical impression came from the band musie he heard being played from nearbv 
barracks He met some of the band musicians and arranged with one of them to teach him flute In 
those earlv vears he also learned to play piano, cello, and other instruments 

His interest in music and science ran parallel throughout his life He composed his first piece of 
music, a polka, at the age of nine - and experimented with fireworks At the age of thirteen, he- 
wrote a concerto for tlute and piano and a string trio - and built a chemistrv lab in his room 

At the age of seventeen he enrolled at the Academv of Medicine and Surgerv where he specialized 
in botany and chemistrx During those student davs. he used ever\ spare moment to participate in 
amateur chamber music gatherings Yet the time awav from his medical studies did not affect his 
grades ! le graduated in 1 856 with high honors He was appointed to an Army hospital where his 
experiences made him determined not to continue as a practicing doctor but to specialize in 
research in 1 858 he received his doctorate and in 1 85^ he went to Heidelberg for additional studv 
of chemistrv 

Heidelberg proved to be important in his musical development because there he met and fell in 
love with a beautiful and talented pianist Fkatenna Protopova She kept his musical interests alive 
even while he was deeplv involved in his chemistrv studies 

In 1862 Borodin accepted an assistant professor's post at the Academv in St Petersburg - and in 
that same vear he met and became a pupil of the pianist-teacher Balakirev At once, composition 
assumed new importance in his life He began composing his First Symphony He became a part 
of Balakirev 's group known as the "Russian Five" or the "Mighty Five", along with Mussorgskv. Cui. 
and Rimsky-Korsakov Their goal was to create a truly national music that sprang from the soil of 
Russian folk art and culture 

In 1863 Borodin married Fkatenna and they moved into an apartment in the Natural History Block 
of the Academy of Physicians Their apartment always overflowed with visitors, yet Borodin never 
seemed to mind these interruptions The Borodms generally had living with them one or more 
orphan children which thev provided for His wife suffered from asthma, developed insomnia, and 
loved adopting strav cats Many times Borodin looked for a page of a composition only to find it 
used to line a cat box or cover ajar of sour milk' 

In addition to his duties as professor at the Academv. he was involved in civic and charitable 
causes He co-founded a medical school for women in 1 872. and taught there 1 5 years He helped 
establish a free laboratory for impoverished science students 

He completed his First Svmphonv in 1867. and began a Second Symphony which he completed 
m 1876 He composed the First String Quartet in 1876. and the tone poem "On Fhe Steppes of 



18 



Central Asia" in 1 880. He began work on his folk opera "Prince Igor" in 1 869. 

While attending a dance at the Academy the night of Feb 27. 1887. he suddenly collapsed and 
died of a burst aneurism at the age of 53 Unfinished at his death were his Third Symphony and his 
opera "Prince Igor" Though he was very skillful in improvisation, many of his compositions have 
been lost because knowing them by heart, he did not commit them to writing 

At his death, many tributes came from musicians and scientists. Above his grave, a monument was 
erected bearing themes from his compositions AND various chemical formulae connected with his 
scientific work 

Rnnsky-Korsakov and Glazunov collected the manuscripts for "Prince Igor", orchestrated the 
remaining sections needed and prepared it for publication 



ABOUT THE OPERA 

It was through the influence of Vladimir Stasov. friend and music critic of the "Russian Five", that 
Borodin's interest in the history, legends, and balladry of medieval Russia was greatly encouraged 
He began work on this folk opera in 1 869 and the libretto is based on an epic poem " f he Lay of 
Igor's Host" Borodin used well-defined Russian and Oriental folk tunes The chorus, :oo, plays an 
important role in the unfolding of the action of the ston- 

The story takes place in 1 185 and deals with the capture of the Eastern Slav Igor. Prince of 
Poutivl, and his son Vladimir by the nomadic Oriental Polovtski led by Khan (ruler) Konchak, the 
enemy of Russia Konchak treats his guests royally and the festivities include a display of Oriental 
dancing - the Polovetsian Dances Khan greatly respects the bravery of Prince Igor and offers to let 
him go free if he will not fight the Polovtski, but Prince Igor cannot agree to these terms. While the 
conquerors are celebrating their recent victories over Poutivl. Prince Igor escapes but his son 
Vladimir chooses to remain behind because he has fallen in love with the Khans daughter The 
opera closes with Prince Igor's return to Poutivl The completed opera was performed in St 
Petersburg in 1890. in London in 1914. and at the Metropolitan Opera in N Y in 1915 



ABOIT THE DANCES 

The Dance of the Polovetsian Maidens comes from Act II The Chora! Polovetsian Dances 
conclude Act II and were completed 

in 1 875 Borodin orchestrated them himself, and the dances were first performed at a concert given 
in St Petersburg in 1879, conducted bv Rimskv-Korsakov 

There are five main dances, preceded bv a lyrical introduction which contains the most famous 
melody Borodin ever wrote. The text for these five dances speaks of songs of praise to Khan '( )ur 
Khan is as glorious as his ancestors." 
The dances are: 

I Introduction Andantmo (#2 on CD) 

II "Dance of the Savage Men" - Allegro vn r» (*■" j 

III "General Dance" - Allegro (#4) 

IV "Dance of Prisoners & Little Boys" - Presto (#5 ) 

V "Dance of Young Girls with Undulating Movements" - Moderato alia breve (similar to I) (#6) 
VT (Repeition of Dance IV)(fr7) 

VII Final Dance - Allegro con spinto (#8) 



19 



SCORE SUMMARY 

1 Introduction Andanti no (Dance of the Polovetsian Maidens) 4/4 

Begins softly with flute solo in measures 2-5 with echoing melodic pattern by clarinet in 

measures 6-11. Measures 11-14 flute reenters with melodic phrase. 
Main theme introduced by oboe in measures 1 5-22 with continuation of theme by English horn 

in measures 23-30. 
In measures 3 1-39 strings enter forte restating main theme with flutes. 
The oboe in measures 41-42 (piano) and then English horn in measures 43-44 conclude this 

lyrical introduction. 
Measure 45 prepares us for transition into next section. 

EXTRA LISTENING TIP: Listen for the triangle which enters at measure 31 and continues 
to measure 45. 
Text: "Fly on the wings of the wind to our native land, you folk songs; to the place where we 
sang in freedom... There you will be freer, oh song, therefore fly there!" 



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20 



TEACHING ACTIVITY ONE 

Movement for Andantino Section - Girls only 

Measures 1-14 opening: Girls move from seats (or large class 
circle on floor) to form 1 large circle, OR You may 
choose to form 2 small circles, depending upon classroom 
pace. Each girl will be either A or B OR 2 small circles 
will be Group A and Group B. 

Girls represent workers and may pretend to carry a small 
gathering basket as they form circle. 
Moving into position is very slow and deliberate. 

a 8 
ft * X y A 

, - x B 

Ax x 



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A *8 



Measures 1 5-22: (Main theme is heard) Group A begins dance 
with right hand in air and left hand on hip. 
Start on left foot and move toward center of 
circle: Left, Right, Left, Lift right foot; 

Step back on Right,Left,Right,Left. 

(REPEAT) 

Measures 23-30: (Variation of Theme) Group B repeats the same 
movements as Group A while Group A watches. 

Measures 31-38: (Strings added) Both groups perform 

movement. Hands are by side (or join hands) 
and are slowly raised until count 4, and then 
slowly lowered on next 4 counts. (REPEAT) 

Measures 39-40: Group A only do beginning pattern IX 

Measures 4 1 -42: Group B only do beginning pattern IX 

Measures 43-44: Groups A & B do pattern 2 of raising and 
lowering hands while moving. 

Measure 45: All remain standing but still. 

The guys are followers of Khan and sit regally around the circle of girls performing. They softly 
pound their fists on the floor to the steady beat. 



21 



Allegro vivo (Dance of the Savage Men) 4/4 

Theme 1 introduced by clarinet solo (mf) in measure 3. This solo continues to measure 10 

In measures 1 1-18 Theme 1 repeated as solo between piccolo and flute while Theme 2 is stated 
by English horn, clarinet, and bassoon 

At measures 19-26 Theme 1 (f) is played by strings, while Theme 2 (f) is played by woodwinds. 

At measure 27 woodwinds now pla\ Theme 1 with strings on Theme 2 with dynamic marking ff. 
This continues to measure 34 

From measures 35-41 brief variations of 2 Themes are heard, with dynamic markings from mf 
to p 

As this dance concludes, an accelerando begins at measure 42, tambourine enters (ppp) with 
crescendo poco a poco and the conclusion is sf with fermata on rest at measure 45 

LISTENING TIP: Tambourine entrance at measure 19-34, and measures 42-45 



TEACHING ACTIVITY TWO 

Use 2 guy leaders and 2 girl leaders to systematically guide each person to his/her place 

Allegro vivo section (the true first dance - our dance #2 ) 4/4 

Measures 1-10 Guys pound fists together as girls pantomime chatter furiously in small groups 

Measure 1 1 . At this section, flute solo enters (Theme 1 )as well as introduction of 

Theme 2 Guys begin standing while continuing to pound fists Girls move back 
to seats on floor in circle. Guys pound fists with intensity as the dynamic 
level increases By measure 19, when piccolo is added, girls are seated and 
guys are standing forming 2 lines within the circle. Also, girls play tambourines 
from measures 19-35 

Guys continue to pound fists through measure 40. 

Measures 42-45: Girls shake tambourines vigorously 

This dance section has 45 measures. By the end of it, guys are now facing each other with an aisle 
about 6 ft. between them as next dance begins. 



22 



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23 



Allegro (General Dance) 3/4 

Timpani solo begins pianissimo at measure 1 and is at fortissimo by measure 5. In 
measure 5, woodwinds and strings enter on beats 2 & 3. Measures 5-12:Theme 
introduced (note the ascending and descending melodic pattern 
Measures 13-20 
Measures 21-28 
Measures 29-36 
Measures 37-44 



Theme 1 repeated. 

Theme 2 introduced forte (listen for accents) 

Theme 1 

Theme 1 repeated. 



Measure 45: Strin'gs (piano) -new theme. 

Measures 45-60: Theme 1 of Section B. 

Measures 61-80: Theme 1 of Section B repeated (Trills by flutes and piccolo) 

Measure 81 : Theme 1 of Section A returns at fortissimo. 

Measures 81-88: Theme 1 

Measures 89-96: Theme 1 repeated 

Measures 97-104: Theme 2 

Measures 105-1 12: Theme 1 

Measures 1 13-120: Theme 1 repeated 

Measures 121-142: Dynamic level piano - pianissimo, ending with fermata 

FORM: ABA 

LISTENING TIP: Triangle heard several times in piece Can your students find/hear it 

TEACHING ACTIVITY THREE 

Guys are in position from last dance. 

Measures 1-4, feeling of 3 is established. 

Measure 5: Moving to center of aisle facing each other, boys step: Left, Right, Left, Right, 

LEFT - HIT RAISED HANDS OF PARTNER and shout "KHAN", then back on Right, Left, 

Right. (Repeat. This will be pattern I.) Measures 5-12 
Measures 13-20: Repeat Pattern 1. 
Measures 21-24 & Measures 25-28: Fists on waist - and 

Step to the right on Right foot, close with left (repeat) 

Step to the left on Left foot, close with right. ( Repeat. This will be Pattern 2. ) 
Measures 29-36: Pattern 1 
Measures 36-44: Repeat Pattern 1 

Section B: Measures 45-80: While guys have arms folded, girls in Groups A & then B move down 

open aisle waving arms slowly. 
Measures 81-88: Guys perform Pattern 1 . Measures 91-96: Repeat 
Measures 97-104: Pattern 2 

Measures 105-1 12: Pattern 1 Measures 1 13-120: Repeat Pattern 1 
Measures 121-128: Pattern 2 Measures 129-136: Repeat Pattern 2 

Then, ALL guys and girls raise hands to Khan. 



24 



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IMPORTANT INFORMATION: At the performance, the S. ( . Symphony will omit dunce 11 ': 

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Measure 1-6: Choppy, short pulses 

;viv.u.iuit / I Jv^tii 11 1 i 1 v II 11 II iv. 11 iv. 1 1 iv- \ UuSMn'ii vx. LClivJa/. i lvcii u i i u i iv.i 

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Measures 65-90 Variation on theme (flutes & brass) Trills in violins 
Measures 91-98: Choppy, short pulses (like beginning) 
Measures 99-1 14 Melody now in violins 1 & 1! (like mea 13) 
Measures 1 15-130 Variation on theme (violins) Forte 
Measures 131-138 Trills in strings 

ruu pi- k; \jr . dm !Ct nnTUfCPM iumpc vi amh r\ am/t \/ii 

I I ILlVl IO 1 N W 1 * \ V^ i_f L^ l^L.. 1 tlL/bll l>/\l 1V.L. VI J \i1U l^nMVL. »ii 

VII Allegro con spsrito (Final Dance; 1 1 

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i nv.iv, 1.3 aii v. A.v. i ICvj ai ivi 1 iuI I i vvj ->v,ll.Attllvjil 

It begins with Theme 1 from Dance II. but performed by all woodwinds except bassoon 
Theme 1! enters in measure 9 in the trombones and cellos 
(There are a total of 59 measures) 

TEACHING ACTIVITY' FQl R 

Students are seated in their original large circle on the floor In front of the majority of students, 
there are 2 paper plates inverted and used as drums Each drummer is holding rhythm sticks that 
are being used as drumsticks Drummers will plav the shortest pulse with one hand, while playing 
the melodic rhvthm pattern with the other hand At measure 38. girls playing triangles will enter 
and strike on the strong beat heard in the upper woodwind section. 

As soon as the Final Dance (Allegro con spinto) begins, all instruments are place'd behind 
students Boys and girls quickly stand and form 4 circles during measures 1-8 Predetermined 
groups 1 . 2. 3. 4 will take turns displaying the final praise to Khan At approximately measure 40 
an»j until tne final measure 5V. an groups win simuiiancousiy pcriorm tuCir n 



I I l\> V V.I I IV,I HO. 



i i./\v.lni»vj i iii-si. j 

After listening to the final section once, allow students to brainstorm for possible, appropriate 
movements such as skipping, jogging in and out of circle, sidestep in a circle, grapevine, running 
in place ^.^ 



26 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

BOOKS 

Bacharach, A. L., ed. The Music Masters: The Romantic Age . Vol 3. Great Britain: The 
Whitefnars Press, Ltd., 1958 

Cross, Milton and David Ewen. Encyclopedia of the Great Composers and Their Music. 
Vol. I. Garden City, NY.: Doubleday & Company, Inc ., 1953 

Pahlen, Kurt Music of the World: A History . New York, N Y : Crown Publishers, Inc.. 1949 

RECORDS 

Borodin, Alexander. The Complete Orchestral Music . National Philharmonic Orchestra RCA 
Records CRL3-2790. Notes by Ates Orga. 1 977 

Borodin, Alexander Prince Igor . Orchestra and Chorus of the National Theatre Opera of Sofia. 
Angel Records. SCL-3714. Notes by Boris ChristofT. 1967 

Borodin, Alexander. Prince Igor . Soloists, Choir, & Orchestra of the Bolsho; Theatre of the 
USSR. CMO 1975-84 

Borodin, Alexander Symphony No. 1 in E flat . Moscow Radio Symphony Orchestra. Capital 
Records. SR-40 1 82 Notes by Rory Guy. 

Borodin, Alexander Symphony No. 2 in B minor . Philharmonia Hunganca Orchestra. 
Turnabout Vox Records TV34273 Notes by R. D. Darrell. 



Sandy Matthews currently teaches general music-chorus at Gnfton School (K-8) in Pitt 

v^UUIliy. oIIC ICL^IVCU ilCI DIViC vjvgivv^ iivjni mai ^uiuuna univv/ouji, aina ncii> laugm nigii 

school choral music as well as directed children's and adult church choirs. She lives in Gnfton 
with her husband. Roy, daughter, April, and son, Andrew. 



Liz Smart currently teaches music at Pactolus Elementary School (K-5) in Pitt County She 
received her BME degree from East Carolina University. Liz has taught in Pitt County for 8 
years, and is, also, Minister of Music at First Baptist Church in Grifton She lives in Greenville 
with her 3 lovely daughters, Catherine, Mary, and Jane. 



I 



27 



Jubilation — An Overture 

Robert Ward (born 1917) 



Classroom Activities 
Bv Robin Smathers 



Highlights About Robert Ward 

-born September 13, 1917 in Cleveland, Ohio 

-began piano lessons around age 9-10, but, being an "all too normal" bov. temporarily 

abandoning his lessons to play ball 
-was actively involved in church and school musical activities 
-was graduated from Eastman School of Music where he majored in composition under Bernard 

Rogers and Howard Hanson 
-completed graduate studies at Juillard with Frederick Jacobi and studied privately with Aaron 

Copland at the Berkshire Music Center (Tanglewood) 
-was the bandleader of the Th Infantry Division Band during World War 11 
-conducted the Doctor's Orchestral Society of New York ( 1949-1955) and became music 

director of the Third Street Music School Settlement (1952-1955) 
-became executive vice-president and managing editor of Galaxy Music Corporation and 

Highgate Press in 1956, holding this post until 1967 when he was named president of 

the North Carolina School of the Arts in Winston-Salem 
-left the School of the Arts in 1978 to accept a position as visiting professor at Duke University 

and became the Mary Duke Biddle Professor of composition there until his retirement in 

1987 
-has excelled in practicallv all forms of composition including five operas ( The ( rucikle won 

a Pulitzer Prize), six symphonies, three concern and assorted works for orchestra, chorus, 

band, voice and chamber ensemble 
-leads an active life with his wife Marv in Durham, N C traveling, composing, and enjoying 

basketball and tennis on television 
-has been described as *a confident fusion of romantic impulse and classical form, characterized 

by an always fluent lyrical line and a keen rhythmic pulse his idiom has never strayed 

far from the invigorating accents of the American musical vernacular" 



Historical Background of Jubilation — An Overture 

-was written while Ward was band leader of the 7th Infantry Division Band during the 
campaigns 

of Leyte and Okinawa 
-is influenced by jazz, "a natural result of the composer's activity at the time with a large swing 

band" 
-is not programmatic beyond the composer's jubilant mood associated with the ending of the 
war 



28 



Classroom Activity #1; The Jazz and Blues Influence 

Objective: Students will use various classroom instruments to experience syncopated rhythms 
and to improvise on the "blues'" scale, approaching an understanding of the 
contemporary/popular styles influencing Ward's overture. 

Note: The melody below is NOT from Jubilation An Overture but is purely for experimental 
purposes, utilizing syncopation and the "blues" scale However. Ward did incorporate 
this scale, using the flatted third and seventh as well as some of the rhythmic idioms 
used below. 



Materials: Recording, charts and transparencies, resonator bells, recorders, small percussion, and 
and Orff xylophones 

Plan This approach should be used as a preliminary lesson to actually study the overture rather 
than a singular lesson, since Jubilation An Overture is a symphonic work influenced 
by jazz, not a jazz composition 

1 Introduce the rhythm of the following melodv using rhythmic svllables 



J A 



to 



to 



M M I 

syn-co- pa ta ta 



etc 



2. Use echo-playing to introduce the melodic counterpart of this tune to the recorders 
Then display a visual of the two repeated measures or teach this part to a barred instrument 
through patchen and solfege hand signs or by rote 

3. As recorders repeat this melodv, have students feel the chord changes for the 
resonator bells using body percussion: 



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Transfer this bordun to the resonator bells or another barred instrument You may wish to give 
the individual bells to children in three groups, (one group for each chord), then point to each 
group on the chord changes. This bordun continues throughout both the A and B sections 

4. After A is well established, have various pitched and unpitched percussion 
instruments improvise over the bordun Any bared instruments should be set up in the following 
blues-like scale, a D pentatonic with the added flatted third and seventh 

in 



2£ 



P 



'The notes in parenthesis are the "blues scale" addition to the pentatonic scale 



2^ 



5 Continue alternating the A section with the B improvisational seetion at your 
discretion, finishing with A 



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Recorders 






Resonator 
bells 



various v 
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-sudr -as— xy-Tophonerrffie t-a4^pfoffier~freffl^ttrii^e— drt ^ , e tc 



Use D,E,F,F#,A,B,C,D' on barred Orff instruments for improv 



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Ke\ lew Remind students that syn-co-pa " s\mboli/es syncopation, which, along with the 
"blues scale" and improvisation, are ja// idioms which influenced Ward's .hibilat ion An 
Overture Now thev are readv to studv one of the other approaches to become familiar with 
Robert Ward "s composition 

( lassroom Activity #2: Form 

( )bjective Students will recogni/e the \arious sections of sonata-allegro form exposition, 
development recapitulation and coda within Jubilation An Overture 

Materials Recording \isual aides 



Plan I Introduce \isuals of the five main themes 

strings , winds, horns ) _^ 




i ifr* II utfffli if 



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( tinman r) ~ 



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violins 



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(timpani i 



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f ff (plus the following derivative 

announced by the trumpets: 



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string's, winds, horns 




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29 



EST 



f 



timpani 



2 Discuss the over all format of the sonata-ai'euro form 



Exposition Developm ent 

rhemel, ke> ofEs. Theme I, D Dm. dm 
Theme II Theme II. fragment 

Theme 111 Theme V, fragment 

Theme IV Theme 1. Bo 

Theme V Theme IV. variation 

Theme [II, leads to bridge 
back to recapitulation 



Recapitulation 

1 heme 1 

Theme II 

Theme III 

I heme IV 

Theme V plus minor 

variation from 

development 



Coda 
Theme i 
(restatement) 



3 Use one of the following suggested visuals to follow this form as the music is played 
a stars and stripes visual ( using our national colors) 
b camouflage visual ( using insignias from the various branches of the armed 

forces t 

c homecoming map (representing the trip home from World War II) 

STARS AND STRIPES VISUAL: 




31 



CAMOUFLAGE VISUAL: 



Exposi tion 



Development Recapitulation Coda 




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o o 



H 
ft 

o 

<0 



army 
,$&%& green 



' ' ' ' i ' I -brown 



c • • 

O T> 



1- 



khak i 



P/, .' 1 r It. green 



Movement might be the natural outgrowth of this visual One could use flags or banners 
bearing the various insignias Dividing the class into the five branches of the armed forces, 
groups could move as thev hear their theme The musical notation for each theme might also be 
written on the banner which could be on the different colors of paper or cloth noted above 



Homecoming Map 

Sinct musical maps have been used extensively in previous Teachers Handbooks, you 
mav feel confident elaborating on this approach Maps seem most useful in following themes 
and calling attention to various tone colors It is important to point out to the students that, 
although Ward's composition is NOT a programmatic piece, this map is used to assist them in 



32 




r 

c 



.•>.•> 



following the music \ isualh as well as reminding thcin of the time period in which it was 
composed 

(lass room Xctivity #3: Percussion Score 
Objective Students will use various unpitched percussion instruments to accompany the five 

main themes o\ .Jubilation \n < ivcrtiirc in order to better recogm/e these themes and 

as a prelude lo discussing the lone colors incorporated b\ Ward 

Materials Recording, chart 01 transparency of rhythm score rh\thm sticks, triangles, cabasa. 
\ibraslap cymbals tone blocks tambourines, maracas. hand drums or such alternatives 
as vou may have in your rhvthm equipment 

Plan 

i I lave students listen to the overture at least one lime either using \ isuals of the 
notation of the five themes or b\ using one ol the suggestions in classroom activitv e2 

_ Point out to ihe students how Ward utilized \anous tone colors for the live themes 
even changing some lone colors when some themes recur in the recapitulation 

3 Review the rhvthm ol each section ol the percussion score noting thai onlv certain 
tone colors will plav on each theme You mav wish to use rhythmic syllables (ta. li-li. to 
svn-co-pa. etc I to assist the students in learning their part 

4 Plav the percussion score along with the exposition section of ihe recording 
'Note Some rhythms have been altered or simplified for easier plaving ) The full percussion 
score is on ihe following page 

Su pplemental Approach: Integrated ( urriculum 

Objective Students will discover how art and music express moments in hislorv thus integrating 
art music and social studies as well as possible activities with geography and literature 



1 .Art Display a print ol Norman Rockwell s celebrated painting Homecoming ( < I 
Note how this was painted in 1945 within ii year of Ward s composing. Inhilaiion hi OxK'riun- 
Compare how both pieces deal with the return to civilian life from World War !l 

2 Literature An After viewing the Rockwell print, discuss how thev would feel if they 
had a lather or brother returning from war 1 hev mav write about this topic or create a visual of 
what homecoming' would look like at their house 

3 Social Studies Geography Have the students utih/e maps and any resources from 
their social studies textbooks concerning World War 11 Point out where Okinawa and I eyte are 
on the map. discussing how Ward wrote the overture in these locations while serving in the 
Seventh Infantry Division Band You may wish to discuss the effect of the atomic bomb 
causing an earlier-than-expected return home 



34 



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35 



Bibliography 

Chase, Gilbert ( 1%6) America's Music New York McGraw-Hill Book Co 

102 lavorile Paintings by Norman Rockwell ( 1978) New York Crown Publishers 

Pamphlet by BMI ( 1987) Robert Hard, HMI New York B.M.I 



» ^ ■:.; •■ 



Personal Biographical Information 

Robin Smathers holds a B S degree in music education from ihe University of 
Connecticut She teaches K-6 music at Weaverville Primary and Weaverville Elementary 
schools in Buncombe county where she has taught for seventeen years She resides in Mars Hill 




Notes 



Copies of Your North C arolina Symphony Book, Teachers Handbook and compact disk 
recordings of the music on this year's program can be purchased from the Symphony office 
Write to The North Carolina Symphony, Attention B K Shapiro. 2 Fast South Street. Raleigh. 
NC 27601 Our telephone number is (919)733-2750, Ext. 230 Fax (919)733-9920 

Please place orders early enough to allow for two weeks delivery time Materials are 
available as long as supplies last 

Be sure to check other sources for information on this year's compositions and 
composers Momma Don 7 'low, and l)e colore* can be found in several music textbooks with 
related activities 

We want to thank all the music educators who contributed to this year's Teachers 
Handbook for their cooperation and enthusiasm 

We encourage you to fill out the comment sheet on the next page and return it to us. 



Orchestral Instruments 



F 


s 


N 


A 


R 


E 


D 


R 


u 


M 


G 


J 


Y 


E 


G 


R 


s 





T 


S 


N 


S 





D 


U 


E 


E 


T 


T 


Q 


E 


A 





Y 


D 





C 


L 


A 


R 


1 


N 


E 


T 


A 


N 


B 


S 


B 


H 


H 


Y 





D 


D 


N 





P 


U 


M 


C 


E 


S 


H 


1 


P 


M 


C 


H 


S 


A 


B 


M 


B 


M 


H 


L 


A 


A 


F 





B 


c 


A 


S 


P 


M 


U 


A 


N 


H 


B 


B 


C 


V 


L 


A 


1 


1 


A 


M 





R 


U 


B 





U 


1 


X 


z 


Y 


L 


p 


W 


B 


1 


R 


T 





T 


R 





B 





E 


X 


S 


R 


J 


M 


T 


T 


M 


C 


W 


N 


D 


D 


R 





J 


E 


A 


L 


K 





V 





B 


D 


M 


D 


P 


W 


F 





M 


H 


W 


K 


L 


X 


B 


X 


1 


Q 


S 


N 


1 


L 





1 


V 


1 





L 


A 


W 


1 


H 


E 


A 


J 


K 


U 


X 


H 





R 


P 


E 


H 


Z 


J 


K 


A 





T 


L 


T 


W 


C 


M 





S 


C 





1 


Y 


S 


X 


B 


J 


R 


E 


T 


G 


N 


P 





U 


J 


w 


B 


T 


Bass drum 












Trombone 
















Bassoon 












Trumpet 
















Cello 












Tuba 


















Chimes 












Viola 


















Clarinet 












Violir 


i 
















Cymbals 












Xylophone 


i 














Double bass 






























Flute 






























French horn 






























Harp 






























Oboe 






























Piccolo 






























Snare drum 












Find these twenty 


instrument names 




Timpani 












up 


down, backward and forward 





36 



Musical Terms 



F 


1 





D 


N 


A 


R 


E 


L 


E 


c 


c 


A 








E 





B 


H 


E 


L 


A 


C 


S 


R 





J 


A 


M 


R 


D 


L 


D 


P 


V 


V 





X 


W 


U 


M 


E 


1 


1 


G 


F 


N 


A 


N 


K 


N 


Q 


K 


N 





B 


S 





S 


E 


F 


C 


1 


C 


A 


T 


K 


T 


D 


Y 


S 


D 


B 


s 


L 


E 


R 


X 


1 


S 


G 


E 


E 


Y 


\ 


N 


R 


E 





L 


Y 


E 


P 


P 


E 


R 


R 


N 


N 


E 


M 


H 


D 


T 


A 


P 


S 


F 


Y 


P 


A 





A 


U 


E 


C 


Y 


J 


R 


1 


R 


c 


Q 





T 


M 


1 


N 


L 


T 


E 


T 


C 





P 


E 


E 


1 





R 


P 


1 





I 


L 


Y 


H 


M 


F 


8 


S 


N 


Z 


A 


S 


M 


D 


P 


M 


M 


A 


M 





N 


1 


T 


D 


H 


T 


1 


Y 


V 


M 


N 





G 


R 


A 


L 


K 











D 


J 


Q 


M 


E 


X 


Z 


T 


P 


P 


D 


R 


D 


H 


P 


B 


V 


Y 


Q 


T 


B 


E 


F 


Y 


V 


T 


F 


Accelerando 












Pianissimo 














Allargando 












Pianc 


> 
















Allegro 












Pitches 
















Counterpoint 












Presto 
















Crescendo 












Rhythm 
















Diminuendo 












Tempo 
















Forte 






























Fortissimo 






























Harmony 






























Largo 






























Major scale 






























Melody 






























Minor scale 










Find these twenty musical terms 


up, 


down 


Moderato 










bac 


;kwar 


d, fo 


rwan 


1 an 


d dia 


aona 


llv 







37 



Composers 





i 


Y 


1 1 
n 


11 d 


P 


F 


M 


N 





S 


N 


A 


H 


W 


Y 




J 


Y 


K 


S 


V 





K 


1 


A 


H 


C 


T 


S 


Y 


H 




N 


Q 


B 


S 


z 


N 


Z 


G 








M 


R 


M 


V 


B 




V 


W 





A 


N 


A 


X 


S 


P 


P 


E 


L 


H 


L 


B 




R 


B 


R 


H 


W 


1 


s 


V 


U 


B 


B 


D 


A 


E 


A 




P 


T 





A 


W 


L 


V 


C 


R 


E 


V 


Y 


R 


D 


C 




P 


E 


D 


Y 


E 


G 


c 


A 


E 





J 


N 


B 


N 


H 




d 


L 


i 


D 


W 


S 


B 


T 


R 


L 


S 


D 


R 


A 


W 




G 


C 


N 


N 


N 


R 


H 


A 


W 


T 


1 


W 


I 


H 


C 




B 


E 


Y 


1 


B 





K 


L 


E 


D 


S 


S 


F 


V 


H 




M 


E 


L 


N 


V 


C 


L 


1 


L 


A 


Q 


U 


Z 


V 


K 




F 


V 


E 


E 


D 


D 


N 


A 


L 


P 





C 


Q 


T 


L 




X 


u 


N 


U 


R 


H 


V 


F 


D 


L 


G 


Y 


U 


X 


N 




s 


D 


H 


Q 


M 


1 


L 


H 


F 


R 


W 


B 


P 


D 


Y 







Y 


P 


M 


V 


Y 


T 


J 


W 


S 


H 


E 


F 


K 


L 


Bach 














Mozart 
















Barber 














Pucci 


ini 
















Beethover 


,1 












Strav 


insk\ 


f 














Bernstein 
Borodin 














Tchaikovsky 
Vivaldi 














Brahms 














Ward 


















Copland 

Corigliano 

Dvorak 


1 






























Handel 
































Hanson 
































Haydn 

Liszt 

Mendelssohn 










Find these composer's names up, down 
backward, forward, and diagonally 





NCS Concert Puzzle 







1 












2 


















3 












4 
























i 
















5 










































6 


7 












8 
































9 


















































10 


































■ ■ 














11 



































































Across 



Down 



5. Also a chemist 
7. Mexican song 
9. Who "don't low?" 
11. Fast in Italian 



1 . leader of orchestra 

2. "forte"means 



3. joyful celebration 

4. Polovetsi leader 

6. "soft" in Italian 

7. Ward lives in 



8. Borodin's country 
10. "Happy man" in Latin 



39 



Musical Instruments 





1 




2 




3 


- 


4 
























■ 


















5 




6 


















































































7 










8 










































































9 


















10 




























11 












































12 














































13 








































■ 


■■■••. 



















Across 



4. str. inst. w/ endpin 
6. largest string inst. 

8. inst. with wood bars 

9. slide brass inst. 

11. large, tuned drums 

12. metal ww inst. 

13. mid-range str. inst. 



Down 



1 . double reed inst. 

2. largest brass inst. 

3. can be ww or brass 

4. single reed inst. 

5. largest ww inst. 

7. smallest brass inst. 
10. smallest string inst 



40 



NCS Concert Puzzle 







1 c 












2 

L 



















3 J 













4 K 










N 




U 








U 















D 




5 

B 





R 





D 


I 


N 










U 




I 












C 




6 

P 


7 

D 


E 


C 





L 


O 


8 R 


E 


S 




H 




I 


U 




T 




A 




U 






9 M 


A 


M 


A 


R 









T 




s 








K 




N 


H 




R 




I 




s 




10 _ 
F 











A 













I 




E 










M 








N 




11 

A 


L 


L 


E 


G 


R 





















I 


























X 











Musical Instruments 










2 T 




3 F 




4 c 


E 


L 


L 













B 




U 




R 




L 












5 B 




6 D 





U 


B 


L 


E 


B 


A 


S 


S 








A 






E 




A 




N 




R 












S 














C 




I 






7 T 






S 


' 


8 x 


Y 


L 





P 


H 





N 


E 




R 





















H 




E 






U 


























9 T 


R 





M 


B 





N 


E 




1 V 








R 










P 










11 T 


I 


M 


P 


A 


N 


I 








E 

























12 F 


L 


U 


T 


E 










L 




























1 V 


I 





L 


A 






















i 


N 
























w 





41 



42 



Questionnaire 



The North Carolina Symphony welcomes your criticisms and compliments on our education 
program. Please use this page or a copy and return it to the address below. 

Please tell us what you think about: 
The Teacher Handbook 



The student booklet 



The teacher workshop 



Your education concert 



Other 



Do you have suggestions for songs 9 



Are you interested in writing for the Teachers Handbook 7 
If so, please give your name and telephone number. 



Jackson Parkhurst, Director of Education 

The North Carolina Symphony 

2 East South Street 

Raleigh, NC 27601 



STATE LIBRARY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



3 3091 00748 3951